Mexican Cocktails

Cóctel de Mariscos (Seafood Cocktail)

This zesty mix of fresh seafood, tomato and lime juices, and hot sauce is a refreshing snack or light meal eaten along Mexico‘s coasts. Click here for the recipe. Coctel de Mariscos (Seafood Cocktail)

Agua de Jamaica (Sweet Hibiscus Drink)

This sweet-tart drink is a popular streetside cooler. Click here for the recipe. Agua de Jamaica (Sweet Hibiscus Drink)<

Atole de Mora Negra (Blackberry Masa Drink)

Ruben Ortega, pastry chef at Hugo’s in Houston, Texas, gave us the recipe or this fruity atoll. Click here for the recipe. Atole de Mora Negra (Blackberry Masa Drink)

Michelada con Camarones (Spicy Beer Cocktail with Shrimp)

This spicy cantina favorite makes an excellent appetizer and thirst-quencher on a hot summer night. Click here for the recipe. Michelada con Camarones (Spicy Beer Cocktail with Shrimp)

Agua de Piña con Nopal (Pineapple and Cactus Drink)

The recipe for this thirst-quencher comes from Hugo Ortega’s Street Food of Mexico (Bright Sky Press, 2012). Click here for the recipe. Agua de Pina con Nopal (Pineapple and Cactus Drink)

Prickly-Pear Margarita

The prickly pear cactus thrives in the deserts of the American Southwest; its bulbous red fruit is prized for many Mexican and Tex-Mex preparations. This legendary margarita, which takes its distinctive flavor from the fruit, comes from bartender Ruben Bernal at Las Canarias restaurant in San Antonio, Texas. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-5

Chavela

A classic version of a Mexican cerveza preparada (prepared beer), the chavela couldn’t be simpler: tomato juice, hot sauce, beer, lemon, and ice, with a salted rim. Drink it on its own, or pair it with a shot of tequila for a real kick. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-6

Tangerine-Mint Sparking Margarita

This citrusy margarita from chefs Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger is brightened with a hint of refreshing mint. If tangerines aren’t available, use oranges instead, with a pinch of sugar if they’re on the tart side. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-7

Mezcalita de Piña

Made with mezcal, grilled pineapple, jalapeño, and lime, this take on the classic margarita is smoky, sweet, and spicy, with an herbaceous kick from cilantro. This recipe is based on one shared with us by Julian Medina, chef/owner of New York City’s Toloache, Yerba Buena, and Coppelia restaurants. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-8

Barbacoa Cocktail

Julian Cox, a bartender at the Los Angeles restaurant Rivera, gave us the recipe for this colorful cocktail, which takes its smoky flavor from puréed chipotle chiles in adobo and its sweetness from ginger syrup. To make your own ginger syrup, boil 1/3 cup sugar and 1/2 cup water with one 2″ piece of peeled and smashed ginger for 5 minutes. Strain and refrigerate. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-9

Frozen Margarita

Here is a version of Mariano Martinez frozen margarita. In 1971 he figured out how to make frozen margaritas from a soft serve ice cream machine. The rest is history. We recommend using Herradura Silver Tequila. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-10

Devil’s Garden

At first sip, lime juice and fresh mint refresh the taste buds, but soon the smoky and spicy undertones of chipotle-infused mezcal creep over the palate. A touch of Cynar, an unusual liqueur made from artichokes, adds a veil of mystery. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-11

Chico

Blackberry liqueur gives this jewel of a cocktail, which was popular in cantinas along the Texas–Mexico border during World War II, its garnet color. Tequila or gin gives it its kick. Click here for the recipe.Mexican Drinks-12

Tex-Mex Michelada

To all those who say you can’t improve on an ice-cold beer, we submit the michelada: a tart-savory eye-opener of beer, Tabasco, worcestershire, and fresh lime juice. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-13

Horchata de Arroz Tostado (Toasted Rice Drink)

Fany Gerson gave us the recipe for this toasted rice horchata, traditionally served in the Mexican state of Campeche. Surprisingly clean and refreshing in flavor, it’s an ideal thirst quencher on a hot day. Click here for the recipe. Horchata de Arroz Tostado

Paloma

One of Mexico’s most popular cocktails, the Paloma is a perfectly refreshing combination of sweet and tart with grapefruit, lime, and a pinch of salt. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-15

Book Club Sangria

This is serious sangria, from the good ladies of the Junior League of Houston. It’s brandy and red wine infused with peaches and pineapple and brightened with ginger ale. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-16

Kentucky Club Margarita

Though this bold shaken cocktail originated in Mexico at Juárez’s Kentucky Club, across the border from El Paso, Texans now claim it as their own. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-17

Sangrita

Josefina Howard, co-founder of New York’s Rosa Mexicano restaurant chain, shared this extraordinary sangrita with us. Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-18

Tequila Sunrise

The recipe for this classic, layered cocktail originally appeared in Bottoms Up! Y Como!, a brochure published in 1934 by the Agua Caliente resort in Tijuana, Mexico. This recipe appeared online in conjunction with David Wondrich’s article “Classic Eye-Openers,” featured in our special Breakfast issue (October 2008). Click here for the recipe. Mexican Drinks-19

Horchata de Melón

Cantaloupe seeds, usually discarded, make a refreshing drink when ground with water. If you’re not using the cantaloupe for something else, cut it into cubes to float in each serving. This recipe was shared with us by Fany Gerson, who sweetens her version of this traditional Mexican horchata with honey and vanilla. Click here for the recipe. Horchata de Melón

 

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Recipes and images courtesy of Saveur.com

 

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2 thoughts on “Mexican Cocktails

  1. Are you trying to get us tipsy this early in the morning? Lol. Thanks for posting. They all look delicious. Happy hour for all!

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