Suggested readings of the month July ’12: How to Seduce a White Boy in 10 Easy Steps

Hello family, it’s that time of the month again. This month’s suggested readings are:

  1. How to Seduce a White Boy in Ten Easy Steps by Laura Yes Yes
  2. Mixed Matches: How to Create Successful Interracial, Interethnic, and Interfaith Relationships by Joel Crohn

The following are the Editorial Reviews the book has received:  

How to Seduce a White Boy in Ten Easy Steps
How to Seduce a White Boy in Ten Easy Steps Quotes: “Be nice to his family. Pretend not to notice the way their house smells. Pretend to like their food. Mimic their barbaric customs at the dinner table.”
― Laura Yes Yes, How to Seduce a White Boy in Ten Easy Steps

“Laura Yes Yes’ work is a church tent revival in your belly, without all the fire and damnation. She is bawdy, brilliant, and subversive in her wit.” — Sonya Renee Taylor, international award-winning poet and activist

“At a time when the formulaic is rewarded and the superficial revered, Laura Yes Yes is winning over audiences across the country the old-fashioned way- with hard writing, tireless editing, imaginative concepts, and uncompromisingly honest presentation.” — Jared Paul, poet/musician/activist

Laura Yes Yes’ sultry, wry first book, How to Seduce a White Boy in Ten Easy Steps, dazzles us with its bold exploration into the politics and metaphysics of identity. From fierce and funny sexual fantasias to cutting observations of interracial dynamics, her work asks us to fully consider what it is to be human in an age of fragmentation and double meanings. There are no easy answers here: the voice of the liberated woman rings clearly as a man-eater in one moment, and shudders under the weight of lost love in the next. Laura skillfully navigates the trauma of being Other while acknowledging the absurdity of our perceptions of race. With precise craft and breathtaking imagery, How to Seduce a White Boy blooms as a ferocious celebration of life. – Summary

The following are the Editorial Reviews the book has received: 

Mixed Matches: How to Create Successful Interracial, Interethnic, and Interfaith Relationships

According to psychotherapist Crohn –  21% of Catholics and 32% of Jews now live in interfaith households, while marriages between blacks and whites more than tripled between 1970 and 1991. In his sensitive, smart treatment of this timely topic, Crohn draws on nearly 14 years of research into how mixed couples deal with each other, with their children, with their families and with society. Most of the book is devoted to interactions within a couple, starting with bad reasons for a mixed match (e.g., stereotypes of the compliant Asian woman; rebellion against parents) and moving on to cultural differences in modes of communication, in the importance of family, in the role of women.

Drawing on numerous examples, Crohn argues that even when the couple is comfortable with their religious choices (an atheist couple of Protestant and Jewish upbringings, or a Catholic Irish-Mexican couple), divergent cultural histories cannot be ignored?particularly when that couple has children. And if upbringing doesn’t raise questions about diverse backgrounds, children often force the issue, asking questions as they try to pinpoint their identities and their place within both family and society. Through exercises, Crohn helps couples examine their cultural baggage, and through examples, he offers models on how to deal with conflict. The one weakness is that while many of Crohn’s examples include a reserved partner or one who considers the past a closed subject, the exercises rely on both partners participating equally. Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
In a largely unnoticed revolution, millions of people are now defying taboos and forming intimate relationships with partners from other cultural, religious, and racial backgrounds. Here psychotherapist Crohn leads such people on a quest to answer the questions: “Should we practice two religions or one?”; “Which holidays should we celebrate?”; and “Should our children’s names reflect their heritage?”

In addition to the social and familial conflicts, Crohn also discusses culturally based conflicts that may too easily be understood merely as irreconcilable personality differences.

He goes on to describe methods for helping couples resolve the problems that arise from varying world views. Various exercises, in-depth questionnaires, and sample dialogue allow the reader to learn by observing how other couples and families have built bridges across their differences.

An exhaustive “resource” section, including support groups, books for young adults, and bibliographies, concludes the book. Crohn’s attempt to address the problems of a broad spectrum of “inter-” marriages will make this an appropriate book for librarians to recommend widely. Recommended for all public libraries. Marty D. Evensvold, Magnolia P.L., Tex.

Both books are available on www.amazon.com. Let me know what you think of the book after you’ve read them. Although both books represent different ends of the interracial spectrum, these books are you assist and guide those new to the interracial life with how to deal with dating, marriage and raising an interracial family..

It is said that reading stimulates the mind. The more you read, the more you open your mind up to new ways of thinking and thus the more creative you will become. I hope you enjoy the suggested readings of the month July ’12: How to Seduce a White Boy in 10 Easy Steps. Happy reading as always!

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3 thoughts on “Suggested readings of the month July ’12: How to Seduce a White Boy in 10 Easy Steps

  1. Pingback: Suggested readings of the month January ’13: The Nanny, Her Perfect Gift | KolorBlind Mag

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